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Wells Fargo delivers

Did you know Sacramento was not always California’s state capital? In the early 1850s, California did not have a permanent capital city. Cities like Benicia and Vallejo competed to host the state legislature. State politicians depended on Wells Fargo to securely send their letters with instructions on managing the state.

No. 1 Sent by Wells Fargo from San Francisco to Benicia, California. Letter enclosed is dated April 19th, 1853, for State Senator J. N. Coffroth from T. N. Cazneau, who was a notary public.

No. 2 Sent by Wells Fargo from San Francisco to Benicia, California. Letter enclosed is dated June 2nd, 1853, for the Secretary of State of California, J. W. Denver, from Thomas Cazneau.

No. 3 Sent by Wells Fargo from Benicia to Vallejo, California. Letter enclosed is dated January 3rd, 1852, from Samuel J. Claikess to W. Van Voorhies, the Secretary of State of California.

No. 4 Sent by Wells Fargo from Mokelumne Hill to J. W. Denver in Benicia, California. Denver was the Secretary of State of California.

Wells Fargo advertisement in the Alta California, 1852.

Wells Fargo bill of exchange for $100 sent from the company’s office in San Francisco to its office at 82 Broadway in New York City, New York. It was sent for Miss Caroline B. Pennyea on December 19th, 1864.